N&C Phlexicare are giving away free invisible disabilities heart shaped badges to raise awareness of invisible illnesses and to ensure that people who live with invisible illnesses feel confident in using the facilities that are available to them, without feeling as though they are being judged by others around them.

About N&C Phlexicare

N&C Phlexicare are British manufacturers and distributors of showering, daily living, access, wall, floor, and kitchen solutions within the healthcare construction market. They design, manufacture and distribute a range of inclusive solutions to make life easier for people with health conditions, as well as their families, carers and professionals involved in their care.

The blue heart

N&C Phlexicare have created a blue heart shaped “Not all disabilities are visible” badge that can be ordered online free of charge to help raise awareness of invisible disabilities. The badge can help open the door to conversations about invisible disabilities and one day, I hope, for greater awareness and education of invisible disabilities to overcome prejudice that many people currently face.

Request your free badge today from the N&C Phlexicare website and help raise awareness of invisible illnesses. It’s everyone’s responsibility to remind others that not every disability is immediately apparent.  Let’s make invisible disabilities #InvisibleNoMore

Written by simonrstones

Simon Stones BSc (Hons) is an award-winning patient leader, advocate and researcher from Manchester in the UK, who was the winner of the international WEGO Health Award for Patient Healthcare Collaborator in 2017. He is a passionate advocate and ambassador for people living with invisible illnesses, inspired and empowered by his own journey with arthritis, fibromyalgia, and inflammatory bowel disease since childhood. He is currently an Associate Fellow of the Royal Commonwealth Society, and a trustee of Fibromyalgia Action UK and RAiISE.

8 comments

  1. At last someone is caring about those with invisible illnesses. I suffer from AS and mental illness, Even when I use my crutch I have people sitting in disabled places on the bus, because I don’t look or act disabled. I even had a one young lady telling me that she was very tired and needed the sit more than me because I looked so good. Why do people think that you can only truly be disabled if you look miserable, are over 65 and have a mobility scooter.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. It’s both frustrating and upsetting Kathryn. I can completely relate to how you feel, having experienced similar situations myself because I’m a young man and appear physically fit from the outside. I really hope that efforts like these will help us to get away from these situations!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I suffer from ptsd.depression,anxiety osteoathritis and endometriois none of these can be seen and I’m often judged as either lazy or benefit scrounger. I always tried so hard to work but always something prevented me from being able to commit fully working. I’d rather be working than feeling so ill or in agony I’d love a pin they look so cute. Lovely way of promoting love and compassion

        Liked by 1 person

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